EXHIBITION OF SCULPTURE | PRAGEETH MANOHANSA
01.10

In his early works Manohansa used spades and mamotees, erected on poles and lined up to symbolize family photos or suspended and descending to represent the retirement of the working class. The concept of the working class, in abstract pieces of sculpture, all rusted and worn, is the flip side of Manohansa’s oeuvre. His conceptual work represents a deeper history of struggle for Sri Lanka’s working class. Figurative and mask sculptures are the most viewed and comprehended of his works, while the former awaits an audience locally that is still preparing itself to absorb conceptual contemporary art. Internationally Manohansa’s works are sought after by collectors in Europe, USA, India and Australia. Manohansa’s assemblage has in a short space of time formed a new movement in contemporary Sri Lankan sculpture. With this Manohansa follows in the steps of sculptors such as Laki Senanayake and Sarath Chandrajeeva, artists whom are still very prominent in the local art scene, in forming a trend and inspiring young artists to think outside of the box. It is not uncommon to see more young students recycling materials for sculpture, and given time Manohansa’s popularity is only bound to inspire more sustainable and contemporary art forms in a fast growing art sceneIn his early works Manohansa used spades and mamotees, erected on poles and lined up to symbolize family photos or suspended and descending to represent the retirement of the working class. The concept of the working class, in abstract pieces of sculpture, all rusted and worn, is the flip side of Manohansa’s oeuvre. His conceptual work represents a deeper history of struggle for Sri Lanka’s working class. Figurative and mask sculptures are the most viewed and comprehended of his works, while the former awaits an audience locally that is still preparing itself to absorb conceptual contemporary art. Internationally Manohansa’s works are sought after by collectors in Europe, USA, India and Australia. Manohansa’s assemblage has in a short space of time formed a new movement in contemporary Sri Lankan sculpture. With this Manohansa follows in the steps of sculptors such as Laki Senanayake and Sarath Chandrajeeva, artists whom are still very prominent in the local art scene, in forming a trend and inspiring young artists to think outside of the box. It is not uncommon to see more young students recycling materials for sculpture, and given time Manohansa’s popularity is only bound to inspire more sustainable and contemporary art forms in a fast growing art scene


download pdf
go back
FAVOURITES 0
facebook instagram twitter blog